The town of Makarska in Croatia

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General presentationGeneral information
Escutcheon of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.Makarska seen since Makar. Click to enlarge the image.Makarska is a city of almost 14000 inhabitants located in Dalmatia power station, in the county of Split-Dalmatia, in Croatia.

Makarska is the economic, cultural and tourist center of all the area called “Riviera de Makarska” (Makarsko primorje).

The port of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.Become as of the years 1960 a very run seaside resort, Makarska allows the practice of all the nautical activities, with a very beautiful beach, long 1500 m and shaded by a forest of pine, and many sandy splits.

Literally built at the bottom of Biokovo, the city is used also basic with impassioned of nature, excursion and sports of mountain, in particular the climbing.

EtymologyEtymology
Makarska is a derivative of the proper name Makra which is the name of the oldest village of the littoral, formerly the capital of the one of the three counties of the principality of Neretva.

With one kilometer of current Makarska, is the village of Makar located at the site of the old city illyrienne of Muccurum.

Makarska is named Macarsca in Italian, and German Macharscha.

SituationSituation

Makarska seen since the sea. Click to enlarge the image.Makarska is located between the solid mass of Biokovo and the Adriatic Sea, on a bay in the horseshoe shape, protected in south-east by the course Osejava and the North-West by the peninsula Saint Peter.

Makarska is to 62 km in the south-east of Split and to 140 km in the North-West of Dubrovnik.

Plan of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.

VisitsVisits

Plan of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.The statue of saint Pierre. Click to enlarge the image.The town of Makarska is made up of an old core of the Mediterranean type and of a recent part with hotels, restaurants and stores.

In spite of the tourist development, the old city of Makarska kept its character.

The principal quay of the city, Velika Riva, is prolonged by the quay Mala Obala, bordered of palm trees, of terraces of coffees to the mode and shops; it gives on the pretty port where many boats of pleasure are moored.

Makarska seen since the sea. Click to enlarge the image.Makarska seen since the sea. Click to enlarge the image.Makarska seen since the sea. Click to enlarge the image.
The Cathedral Saint Mark (Crkva Svetog Marka)
North of the central place was built at the 18th century the cathedral Saint Mark (Sveti Marko), built of 1700 to 1766. The church Saint Mark is the seat of the bishopric of Makarska since 1828; Makarska is also the second seat of the archdiocese of Split-Makarska.
The cathedral Saint Mark. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The cathedral Saint Mark. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The cathedral church Saint Mark has an invaluable collection of sculptures, tables and objets d’art crowned. The most beautiful furnace bridge of the church, encrusted with marble, is signed by the Venetian sculptor Pietro Onighi of the 18th century. Another furnace bridge, studded nails of money, is that of the Virgin of the Rosary (1818).
The cathedral Saint Mark. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The cathedral Saint Mark. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The cathedral Saint Mark. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The Place Kačić (Kačićev Trg)
Since the landing stage, steps lead to the great place Kačić (Trg Andrije Kačića). The place is inclined and closed by the cathedral baroque Saint Mark (Sveti Marko).

Behind the church an old school is dating from the end of the 19th century, decorated traditional elements and néo-rebirth. Today the building shelters the Public library, the Gojak Gallery and the Music school.

The Kačić place. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The Kačić place. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The principal place is the place where one organizes the festivals and the other festivities.
The Kačić place. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The Kačić place. Click to enlarge the image.The Kačić place. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The Statue of Andrija Kačić
The statue of Andrija Kačić. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The statue of Andrija Kačić. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The Kačić place owes its name to the popular poet more known, not only of the area of Makarska, but also of all Dalmatia: the brother Andrija Miošić Kačić. He is the author of the book which is read the most in Dalmatia after the Bible, heading “Razgovor ugodni naroda slovinskog” (pleasant Conversation of the Slavic people), published in Venice in 1756.

Its statue was set up there in its honor; it is the work of the famous Croatian sculptor Ivan Rendić (1889).

The Venetian Fountain (Mletačka Česma)
The Venetian fountain. Click to enlarge the image.On the Kačić place, between the statue of Andrija Kačić and the cathedral Saint Mark, a Venetian fountain of style baroque going back to 1775 is. When the drinking water drains were posed in Makarska, the authorities made engrave on the fountain prohibition to wash clothing there and to let there drink the cattle.
The Venetian fountain. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The Venetian fountain. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The Venetian fountain. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The Church Saint Philip Neri (Crkva Svetog Filipa Nerija)
The church Saint Philip Neri. Click to enlarge the image.The church Saint Philip Neri (Sveti Filip Neri) is on the sea front (Velika Riva). Built in 1757, it is a church of style late baroque of the 18th century.

The church Saint Philip Neri. Click to enlarge the image.

The Franciscan Monastery Saint Mary-of-Sky (Franjevački Samostan Blažene Djevice Marije)
The Saint Mary monastery. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The Franciscan monastery is at the end is quay of Makarska.

The Franciscan ones came in Makarska at the end of the 15th century and settled apart from the village close to the Saint Mary church built in the years 1400.

The Saint Mary monastery. Click to enlarge the image.The monastery was built at the beginning of the 16th century and was renovated in 1540; its current form goes back to 1614. The bell-tower baroque of the church goes back to 1715.

The Franciscan monastery was transformed into mosque under the Turkish occupation.

The Franciscan monastery shelters a very rich library with many books and rare incunables. The modern church of the monastery contains an art gallery of paintings crowned baroques (“Assumption of Marie” of Pietro De Coster, 1760) and immense “a Deposition” in mosaic, behind the furnace bridge.
The cloister of the Saint Mary monastery. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The cloister of the Saint Mary monastery. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The cloister of the Saint Mary monastery. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The Museum of the Shells (Malakološki Muzej)
The Museum malacologic. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The Malacologique Museum is in the cloister of the monastery of Franciscan, behind the Saint Mary church.

This Museum of the Shells, open in 1963, contains one of the richest collections of shells in the world; the shells come from all the continents.

Museum of the shells. Click to enlarge the image.Addresses: Franjevački could 1

Schedules: the every day safe of the dimanches, 10:00 to 12:00 and 17:00 to 19:00

Paying entry: 10 kunas.

The Palace Tonolli (Palača Tonolli)
The quay of Mala Obala is interesting from the architectural point of view: one finds there a succession of houses of 18th and 19th centuries, whose Tonolli villa, remains of style late baroque of the 18th century of Venetian influence.

In front of the Tonolli palace is a Venetian column carry-flag hones some (Mletački Štandarac).

The Tonolli villa. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The Tonolli villa. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The column carry-flag in front of the Tonolli palace. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The Museum of the City (Gradski Muzej)
The Museum of the City (Gradski muzej) contains a very modest collection of photographs and objects evoking the past of the city.

Addresses: Obala kralja Tomislava 17 (beside the tourist office, close to the landing stage).

Schedules: the every day except Sunday and bank holidays, of 9:00 to 13:00, and 17:00 to 19:00 (of 18:00 to 21:00 in summer).

Tariff of entry: free.

The Palace Ivanišević (Palaca Ivanišević)
The Ivanišević Palace is a palace of style late baroque, the monument most representative of the residential architecture of the 18th century illustrated by the Alačević palaces, Karalipeo-Mrkušić, Vuković et cetera. The palace is located in the Eastern part of the old city.
The Monument with the Marshal Marmont (Marmontov Spomenik)
A monument in the shape of pyramid at narrow base was set up in 1808 at the western entry of the city in honor of Marmont marshal.
The Sea front (Riva)
The sea front. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The sea front mixes without complex the vestiges with the Venetian period baroque, the Austrian time and the modern buildings. But the unit does not miss a charm, with its coffee terraces, its worthy palm trees, the slapping of the ropes along the masts and the bright colors of the boats. Towards the west, let us bridge them marina and the peninsula Saint Peter offer a beautiful panorama on the city and Biokovo in background. On the side of the marina, a shaded alley shelters the players of game of bowls and attractions for the children. It leads to the beach bordered of pines.

The sea front. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).

The Port (Luka)
The port is sheltered at the bottom of a framed bay of two almost wooded islands: that of the west, the peninsula Saint Peter (Sveti Petar), delimits a long beach (nearly 2 km), one of most beautiful of the surroundings.
The port. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The port. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The Bay (Uvala)
The bay of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.The bay of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The bay of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.
The bay of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.The bay of Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.
The Peninsula Saint Peter (Poluotok Sveti Petar)
At the western end of the quay Obala Kralja Zvonimira begins a coastal walk which makes it tower of the peninsula Saint Peter to the headland where the headlight Saint Peter is built (20 minutes of walk to the headlight). The peninsula owes its name with the church Saint Peter which is there. The peninsula Saint Peter is used as park garden and has also beaches and a cave.
The peninsula Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image.The peninsula Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image.
The peninsula Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The peninsula Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The peninsula Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image.
The Statue of Saint Peter (Kip Svetog Petra)
At the entrance of port, drawn up on the peninsula Saint Peter, the statue of saint Pierre takes care on Makarska.
The statue of saint Pierre. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The statue of saint Pierre. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The statue of saint Pierre. Click to enlarge the image.
The Church Saint Peter (Crkva Svetog Petra)
The church Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image.The church Saint Peter was built at the 13th century. It was destroyed by an earthquake, and was rebuilt in 1962 in 1992-1993.
The church Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image.The church Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image.The church Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).
The Headlight Saint Peter (Svjetionik Sveti Petar)
The headlight Saint Peter was built in 1884. The building, out of stone, counts one stage including an apartment which can be rented by the holiday makers.

The rock beach which is at the bottom of headlight is attended especially by nudists, without being a naturist beach strictly speaking.

The headlight Saint Peter (Tengilorg author). Click to enlarge the image.The peninsula Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image in Fotolia (new tab).The headlight Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image.
The Cape Osejava (Rt Osejava)
The course Osejava. Click to enlarge the image.The course Osejava. Click to enlarge the image.East of quay the street Marineta extends which joined the wooded avenue of the Cape Osejava where is the large Osejava hotel built in 1914.

History and traditionsHistory, literature, arts, traditions, legends, religions, myths, symbols…

HistoryHistory
In prehistory - as of the middle of the 2rd millenium before J. - C. - there was a colony close to current Makarska. It is thought that it was a stage used by the Cretan ones on their way to the Adriatic (the road known as “road of amber”). However, it was only one of the ports having bonds with the large Mediterranean, as shows it by a copper shelf with systems of measurement Cretan and Egyptian; a similar shelf was found in the Egyptian pyramids.

The first inhabitants of Makarska which one has testimonies were Illyreens, arrived at the 4th century before J. - C. They founded the village of Muccurum. During the era illyrienne, the area of Makarska was part of the broad alliance of tribes directed by the tribe of Ardéens, founded at the 3rd century before J. - C. in the area of the river Cetina (Omiš) to the Vjosë river in current Albania.

At the 3rd century after J. - C., the Romans were made main from the Adriatic by demolishing Ardéens into 228, but it took them two centuries to impose their domination. The Empire Romain sent his soldiers veterans to settle in the conquered area.

The colony of Inaronia on the Table of Peutinger. Click to enlarge the image.At the 4th century, Makarska appears in the Table of Peutinger like the port of Aronia, Inaronia; but Muccurum is mentioned as a larger colony which developed in the more inaccessible part of the mountain of Biokovo, undoubtedly on the borders of the Roman civilization. With the site of Muccurum, with one kilometer of current Makarska, the village of Makar is today. It is then a stage on the coastal road of Salone (Roman capital of Dalmatia) with Narona.

Thanks to its strategic geographical location, Muccurum became an important center.

After the division of the Empire in 395, this part of the Adriatic coast was integrated into the Roman Empire of the East.

Makarska appears on the acts of the Synod of Salone of May 4th, 533 after J. - C., when the diocese of Muccurum (Makarska) was created.

In 548, Muccurum was destroyed by the army of Ostrogothic king Totila. The Byzantine Emperor expelled Goths of the East (Ostrogothic).

During the 7th century, Slavic tribes conquered the territories around the rivers Neretva and Cetina and created the principality of Neretva. Makarska, under the name of Mokro, was the center of this principality.

These Croatian tribes settled along the shore, became excellent sailors, and were delivered to the hacking. These intrepid pirates attacked Venetian with such an effectiveness that the doge of Venice Pietro Candiano 1st, sought to punish the activities of piracy of the ships of the city by sending his fleet; but it was overcome in Makarska on September 18th, 877.

For their ships, the Venetian ones last during a time to pay in Narentins - inhabitants of the principality of Neretva - a right-of-way on the Adriatic.

Towards 950, the Byzantine emperor Constantine Porphyrogénète, in his work “Of the Administration of the Empire” (De administrando imperio) names Narentins, Arentanima, or Neretvanima, and their countries, Pagania. Their cities are named: Moroko (formerly Muccurum), Verulia (Gornja Brela), Ostrok (Zaostrog), Slavinac (Lapčan close to Gradac), and they control these islands: Meleta (Mljet), Psara (Hvar), Bracis (Brać), Hoara (Sušac), Jis (Screw) and Lastovo.

For the period of the principality of Neretva a port known under the name of Makar developed on the coast.

Under the reign of Croatian king Petar Krešimir IV (1058-1074), Makarska is attached to the Kingdom of Croatia. At the 12th century, Makarska is still controlled by Croatian kings, then hungaro-Croatian.

At the 14th century, benefitting from the competition between the Croatian leaders and their fights for the power (1324-1326), Bosnien Ban Stjepan Kotromanič annexed the coastal region of Makarska. Makarska will remain under the cut of the Bosnian sovereigns with 14th and 15th centuries.

During the 15th century, the Othoman Turks undertook the conquest of Balkans. In order to protect his territory from the Turks, the duke Vukčič gave, in 1452, the steps of Krajina and Neretva to the Venetian ones.

However, the coastal area of Makarska was conquered and destroyed by the Turks in 1499.

The name of Makarska is quoted for the first time in a Turkish document of 1502 of Muhammad Musina, telling how the nuns of Makarska were authorized to repair their church.

Later, the Turks made, during a time, of Makarska the center of a Turkish province (nahija). To defend oneself against the Venetian ones, the Turks strengthened the city in 1568. The Turkish fortresses with Makarska were built in the fields of the famous architect Hajrudin, the author also of the bridge of Mostar. The city was surrounded by walls protected by three turns.

Chart of Comocio. Click to enlarge the image.A chart of Makarska in engraving, of the Italian cartographer Camocio (1572), illustrates the Venetian attempt at recovery of Makarska after the battle of Lépante in 1571; it is the oldest representation of the aspect of the city which one preserves.

Makarska remained occupied until 1646. One period of alternate domination lasted until 1684; the Turkish threat ended in 1699. During this period of many buildings, especially crowned, demolished under the Turkish yoke, were renovated and restored.

The area of Makarska remained under the cut of Sérénissime until its fall in 1797. The area was given to the Austrians by the treaty of Campo-Formio (1797). The Austrian army entered Makarska and remained there until Napoleon took the top.

The French arrived at Makarska, on March 8th, 1806 and remained there until 1813. It was one era of prosperity, of cultural development, social and economic. Under the French domination of the laws on education were promulgated in Croatian language - for the first time in several centuries; schools were open. To this time the obelisk set up in honor of Marmont marshal goes back, who is now located at the western entry of the city.

After the Napoleonean defeat, the Congress of Vienna allotted Makarska to Austria-Hungary. At the 19th century, Makarska knew a strong growth, a financial and cultural development. However the Austro-Hungarians imposed a policy of Italianization.

After the fall of the Empire Austro-Hungarian, Makarska was integrated into the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. In 1914, the first hotel was built, initiating the tradition of tourism in the area.

During the Second World War Makarska was part of the State independent of Croatia. It was used as port for the national marine and was the seat of the central naval Command of the Adriatic, until it was moved in Split.

InformationPractical information

General information
Makarska profits from a Mediterranean climate: the winters are hot and wet, while the summers are hot and dry. Makarska is one of the hottest cities of Croatia.
Weather and forecasts
Tourist office
Chart of the excursions with Makarska. Click to enlarge the image.The Tourist office is on the west coast of the quay, after the landing stage of the ferries, at the ground floor of the Tonolli villa.

Addresses: Obala kralja Tomislava bb.

Telephone: 00,385 (0) 21.616.288/612 002

Website: www.makarska-info.hr

Summer times: from June to September: Monday to Saturday, 8:00 at 21:00; Sunday, of 6:00 to 21:00

Winter times: from October to May: Monday to Saturday, 7:00 at 14:00; Sunday, of 8:00 to 12:00

Road transports
National lines of coach connect Makarska to Split (1. 15), Zagreb (8 H), Dubrovnik (3. 15).

Local lines for Brela, Baška Voda, Podgora.

An international line serves Mostar.

Bus station - addresses: Ante Starečevića 30; telephone: 00,385 (0) 21,612,333

Website: www.promet-makarska.hr

Ferry
A ferry of Jadrolinija connects Makarska to the port of Sumartin (Saint Martin) on the island of Brač.

4 crossings per day from September to June, 5 crossings per in July and August day.

Duration: 30 minutes.

Website: www.jadrolinija.hr

Harbor office of the port - Telephone: 00,385 (0) 21,611,977.

The peninsula Saint Peter. Click to enlarge the image.The ferry of Makarska with Sumartin. Click to enlarge the image.
Clock and watch maker (Urar)
The master-clock and watch maker. Click to enlarge the image.A problem of watch with Makarska? Only one address! :

Subdue Mrkušić, Master-clock and watch maker (Majstor Urar)

Marineta 1, Makarska

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The town of Brela in Croatia
The town of Baška Voda in Croatia
The town of Makarska in Croatia
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The county of Split-Dalmatie in Croatia - Booklet Dalmatian Zagora (pdf)
The county of Split-Dalmatia in Croatia - Booklet Dalmatian Zagora (pdf)
The county of Split-Dalmatia in Croatia - Booklet Islands (pdf)
The town of Split in Croatia
The Cetina river in Croatia
The town of Omiš in Croatia
The riviera of Makarska in Croatia
The natural park of Biokovo in Croatia
The island of Brač in Croatia
The island of Hvar in Croatia
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